Bluecomb, Avian Monocytosis, Pullet ...

Bluecomb, Avian Monocytosis, Pullet Disease in Laying Hens

Bluecomb, Avian Monocytosis, Pullet Disease in Laying Hens

It was commonly reported prior to 1960 but it is rare now.

There is some opinion that the disease has disappeared completely

Happenings / Clinical Signs

Visibly sick birds

  • Many visibly sick birds
  • Affected birds show depression
  • Soiled vent feathers or pasty droppings
  • The head and its appendages (combs and wattles) are abnormally congested and may appear cyanotic (from which the name blue comb obviously is derived)
  • Shrivelling of the shanks are observed (signs of dehydration)

Egg drop

  • Severe drop in egg production
  • Egg production drop rapidly

Head Comb Wattles Face Nostrils Sinuses Mount Beak Ear lobes

  • The head and its appendages (combs and wattles) are abnormally congested and may appear cyanotic (from which the name blue comb obviously is derived)

Eyes

  • Swelling of the eyes

Mortality

  • Mortality may be sporadic and usually about 5%  but may be as high as 50%
  • In the more subacute form signs are less pronounced and deaths are more sporadic

Dead Birds

  • Birds are usually in good condition 

Droppings

  • Whitish diarrhea
  • Pasty droppings

Feathers

  • Feathers around the vent are conspicuously  soiled with excreta
  • Occasionally the disease precipitates a moult

A sudden onset condition of chickens early in lay with high morbidity and mortality. It is associated with hot weather, water deprivation, toxin and possibly a virus infection. It was commonly reported prior to 1960 but it is rare now. Clinical signs include watery diarrhea, wet litter/manure, dark comb and wattles, dehydration and drop in egg production and mortality may be high.

 

Causing Agents
It is associated with hot weather, water deprivation, toxin and possibly a virus infection. It was commonly reported prior to 1960 but it is rare now. There is some opinion that the disease has disappeared completely. Pathologists has been puzzled over the sudden disappearance of the disease, and have speculated that it was due to variant strains of infectious bronchitis viruses prior to development of modern vaccines
Affected Systems/Organs
Reproductive, Digestive and Urinary System.
Spread
Unknown
Mainly Affects
Liveability and Egg Production. Digestive Tract Wet Litter/Manure. Watery Diarrhoea.
Solution
Good management. Hygiene. Adequate water supply. Drug therapy. Molasses, multivitamins in water.
Suggested Actions
  • Can be confirmed with clinical signs and gross lesions
  • Can be managed with feed additives, off-the-shelf medications
  • Diagnosis should be confirmed with rapid assays and/or a certified laboratory
  • Veterinary intervention is recommended

Impact on Egg quality

0

Impact on Liveability

2


Impact on Production

2

Overall Economic Impact

2



https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924001035298;view=1up;seq=13

Peterson E.H. 1978 .Servicemasn's Poultry Health Handbook. page 149

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